Tuesday, July 9, 2013

What the f**k, Roxy? #WhoAmIJustGuess

Have you seen the video Roxy released to promote the 2013 Roxy Pro Biarritz?  Here it is, if not:


Now, before I go on my rant and lose your attention because I'm rambling, here is the most important piece of this:

Cori Schumacher, one of the best surfers I have ever had the pleasure of being in the line-up with, wrote a great post and has started a petition that she is going to hand-deliver to Roxy to ask them to step up and be a responsible brand by discontinuing their objectification of women.  Please sign it if you agree.  And until Roxy can figure out whether they're going to promote sex or surfing, use your dollars to support independent surf brands instead.

Ok, now here's what I think:

I'll admit, it's pretty hot. It would be an awesome underwear, hair removal, self-tanner, "waking up in the digital world", or maybe even white button up shirt commercial.  But as a promo for women's surfing, this is a disgrace.

Where is the surfing? Why is she paddling out on a tiny board in non-existent waves where she would catch nothing? Why does she get dressed just before she takes a shower? What kind of surfer wastes water by showering just before getting into the ocean anyway?!

If you've already seen this, you've probably also seen the accompanying backlash, which makes me feel even more certain that female surfers deserve to be marketed/promoted for so much more than our sexy bods. If brands showcased the level of skill and athleticism in women's surfing today, that would be enough to get people to pay attention to their contest.  Hell, you could even add a little bit of sexiness to some real surfing just to be sure people would pay attention, and we probably wouldn't complain about it. But objectifying a woman like this supposedly to promote an sporting event sends the message that how you look rather than what you do is what matters.  Don't we get enough of that message already?

It's really sad because there aren't that many brands focused on women's surfing.  Those that do are in a unique position to use their marketing and brand to empower females and inspire us - especially the easily-influenced younger generation - rather than re-enforce the "how you look is most important" message we hear over and over and over again.

Shame on you Roxy. #RoxySucks

3 comments:

Nicole Bulone said...

Well said, Liz! I am not a surfer but understand as a woman how our society objectifies us and how much our worth is based on our society's concept of "beauty" not our brains or athleticism.

Nicole Bulone said...

Well said, Liz! I am not a surfer but understand as a woman how our society objectifies us and how much our worth is based on our society's concept of "beauty" not our brains or athleticism.

Austin said...

I thought the video was well done.

The problem is that surf companies sponsoring these events are forced to target to a larger audience to fulfill the economics of putting these n, the cost of just the webcast for these things runs close to 1mm I've been told.

As surfers we can appreciate a well shot video of Steph Gilmore getting pitted at La Graviere, but unfortunately to the average joe what's the difference between pumping Hossegor and pumping Rockaway-not much. To get the eyeballs you have to have chicks like Alana and Laura Enever out there promoting their heinys on Instagram, and you can bet brands will pay top dollar.

Would love to know how many folks tune in to the New Zealand women's asp webcast when they are covered head to toe in rubber, guessing its quite low and the sponsor ends up pissing that money away.

So the old saying goes, sex sells.

Austin